Welcome to the research page of TASZK Security Labs!

Here you can find a collection of advisories from coordinated disclosures, publications of our original research work, and the occasional infosec war stories and musings.

Recent Articles

[BugTales] UnZiploc: From 0-click To Platform Compromise

Recently we have disclosed new advisories related to the remote exploitation of Huawei smartphones. The research that led to these findings was motivated by analyzing new interfaces for remote code execution on a mobile platform. After our work on exploiting Huawei’s Kirin via its baseband interface, we wanted to explore the possibilities of logic bugs as RCE vectors in a modern smartphone chipset, as opposed to memory corruption scenarios that are more common in public research. Logic bugs can be the most powerful because they have the potential to bypass almost all the exploit mitigations that are the typical focus these days, like ASLR, N^X, sandboxing parser code, etc.

[BugTales] Exploiting CSN.1 Bugs in MediaTek Basebands

This summer at Black Hat, we have published research about exploiting Huawei basebands (video recording also available here). The remote code execution attack surface explored in that work was the Radio Resource stack’s CSN.1 decoder. Searching for bugs in CSN.1 decoding turned out to be very fruitful in the case of Huawei’s baseband, however, they were not the only vendor that we looked at - or that had such issues. Around at the same time that we investigated Huawei’s baseband, we also looked into the same attack surface in the baseband of MediaTek Helio chipsets. As the timelines in our advisories (1, 2, 3, 4) show, these vulnerabilities were reported way back in December 2019 and the MediaTek security advisories were released in September 2021 initially and updated in January 2022.

Recent Advisories

CVE-2022-22256: Huawei HWLog KASLR Leak

In this advisory we are disclosing a vulnerability in the Huawei log device that allows any unprivileged process to learn the value of randomized kernel pointers. The vulnerability can be used to defeat KASLR mitigation. Huawei kernels are shipped with custom log devices (/dev/hwlog_dubai, /dev/hwlog_exception and /dev/hwlog_jank) that facilitate better system diagnostics through a series of ioctl calls. One of these diagnostics module is referred to as memcheck, and it provides detailed statistics about the system memory usage. These statistics can disclose randomized kernel pointers to an attacker, enabling them to defeat the KASLR security mitigation. Due to an access control configuration error, these ioctls are exposed to untrusted and isolated application contexts, as a result any unprivileged process can exploit this vulnerability.

CVE-2022-22252: Huawei HWLog Vmalloc Use-After-Free

In this advisory we are disclosing a vulnerability in the Huawei log device that allows any unprivileged process to disclose sensitive information from the kernel. Huawei kernels are shipped with custom log devices (/dev/hwlog_dubai, /dev/hwlog_exception and /dev/hwlog_jank) that facilitate better system diagnostics through a series of ioctl calls. One of these diagnostics module is referred to as zrhung, and it provides information and configuration options to monitor hung processes. The implementation of the config set ioctl contains a race condition vulnerability that allows an attacker to free the underlying buffer that holds the configuration data. Consecutive config get ioctl calls use the dangling pointers to read and disclose, potentially sensitive, dynamically allocated kernel data.